Brown Acid: The Thirteenth Trip – Album Review

Various Artists – Brown Acid: The Thirteenth Trip

RidingEasy Records

Release date: 31/10/2021

Running time: 35 minutes

Review by: Alun Jones

8.5/10

Back in early 1970, I was in LA working for Jim Morrison, singer of the Doors.  Morrison was a pretentious, drunken bore – but we did have a few old laughs.  This one time, Jimbo was mid-liaison with a young lady in her upstairs apartment, and I had to pick him up in his new car before the pair were interrupted by her husband.  Parked in a gleaming white Dodge Challenger under the first-floor window, there was no fire escape and Jim had to jump out of the window onto the roof of his car.  It was a hard top, not a cabriolet, and Jim’s fat arse flattened it like an egg box when he hit it.  He wasn’t in the best shape at that point.  Wrecked that beautiful car, too.  Luckily, I could still see out of the window, and drove off in hysterics, while chubby Jim tried to squeeze into his tiny leather trousers.

Great days, indeed.  And the memories of that time always come flooding back when I spin one of these Brown Acid compilations from RidingEasy Records.  Yet again, the guys have dug out some long-lost treasures of the early hard rock and proto metal variety, to return phoenix like from the netherworld.

Things get underway splendidly with “Run Run” by Max, a funky riff rocker that will light up your lava lamp straight away.  It’s probably my favourite on another strong collection.  Next is “Dark Street” by Ralph Williams and the Wright Brothers – fuzzy guitars and great vocal melodies with a faint air of menace.  Geyda provide “Third Side”, another pacey rocker, reminiscent of the MC5.

Following that, there’s Gary Del Vecchio, who’s apparently “Buzzin’”.  But then, who wasn’t in those days?!  It’s party time blues rock in the vein of early Zep.  John Kitko is suffering from “Indecision”, as proven by the psychedelic jam of the start contrasting with the speedy, aggressive main body of the song – with Alice Cooper-like vocals.   

“Hope” by Bacchus reminded me of old Jimbo’s band doing “Roadhouse Blues”.  Master Danse are up next with a very heavy blues number, “Feelin’ Dead”.  It’s a slow, ponderous song with a melancholy vibe – which I’ll swear was stolen by The Cult for their obscure B-side “Wolf Child’s Blues”.

Orchid offer up the weakest track on the album, “Go Big Red”, a fairly unexceptional garage rock number.  It’s fun and still has some charm, though.  Then you’ve got Dry Ice and “Don’t Munkey with the Funky Skunky”, a crazy fast paced number that’s like The Monkees and Jimi Hendrix jamming a Eurovision novelty song.  On drugs.  Finally, a strong final track from Good Humore, “Detroit” – a catchy tribute with a sprinkling of MC5 at their most rock’n’roll.

And there we have it: another fine collection of rock fossils unearthed and displayed for our enjoyment, never to be forgotten again.  It may be “the Thirteenth Trip”, but this ain’t unlucky for some – it’s gold all the way.

Remember that World Wide Web thing? Well, you can check out RidingEasy Records at various site webs, such as their own, Bandcamp, Facebooks, Twidder, ChewTube and Insta.

This review was presented to you by Platinum Al in association with Ever Metal.

More from the American Classic Car Show

Stars and Stripes American Classic Car Show, Tatton Park

Part 2

Last summer I paid a visit to the American Classic Car Show at Tatton Park.  This was back in early July 2016.  I promised some more photos of the amazing automobiles seen on that visit, but didn’t get round to sharing – until now.

We’re in the grip of miserable January right now, but it was a fine summer’s day when we went to the car show.  My apologies if these shots remind you of warmer, brighter days.  But just look at those cars!

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On display were all types of classics, from 50s chrome and fins to 70s muscle cars and beyond.  I always enjoy spotting vehicles similar to those that appeared in some of my favourite films and television shows.

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The car show is loads of fun with plenty for all the family to enjoy, with food and drink, music and entertainment, not to mention shopping – in addition to the cars on show.

A trip to the Stars and Stripes American Classic Car Show is highly recommended!

Check for events info at Tatton Park here.

Hope I haven’t repeated any of these photos in the earlier post.  You can see the previous post here.

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The sensational General Lee from The Dukes of Hazzard.  Loved that show, and I love Dodge Chargers!  Apologies for the flag.

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Below (in white) you’ll see a Ford Galaxy 500 – as immortalised in song by the awesome Reverend Horton Heat!

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More Classic American Cars

Stars and Stripes American Classic Car Show, Tatton Park

The American Classic Car Show is this weekend at Tatton Park – 4th July weekend.  My, how time has flown since my last post about this great event.

In the last article, I shared some photos of classic chrome and fins autos from the 50’s rock’n’roll era.  This time, I thought I’d share some cars from a slightly later period – the muscle cars of the late 60’s/early 70’s.

These are the cars I really love.  They’re the cars on all those classic cop shows like Starsky and Hutch; or brilliant films like Vanishing Point.  These are also the cars that I had Matchbox and Corgi replicas of – they were my favourites then, and they still are now.

Why don’t cars look like this any more, he asks with a tear in his eye…

Enjoy the photos.  And if you can get to Tatton Park this weekend, enjoy the show.

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And I saved the best till last.  There were many great car shows from my childhood, and many iconic cars.  The General Lee from the Dukes of Hazard is my all time favourite, though.  A beautiful Dodge Charger, it makes me weep when I hear how many of these cars they wrecked making that programme.

A word about the flag, too.  I do not generally discuss politics on my blog, but I will declare that I’m no right winger.  In fact my opinions are very much the opposite.  I appreciate, however, that the Confederate flag shown on the top of the General is considered offensive.  However I have decided to show the car here for posterity, as it’s a fine machine.  The flag remains obscured for reasons of sensitivity.  I admire the car, remember the silly television show, but do not advocate prejudice.  Peace.

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The Tatton Park website is here.

Tatton Park, Knutsford, Cheshire WA16 6QN

01625 374400